Accessible Canada Act & iMPact Day

Two items that may be of interest to you: 
 
1) The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science and Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, introduced Bill C-81, the proposed Accessible Canada Act. The bill would require organizations under federal jurisdiction to identify, remove, and prevent barriers to accessibility, including those related to the built environment, employment, information and communications technology, the procurement of goods and services, the delivery of programs, and transportation.
 
2) Imagine Canada is launching iMPact Day, a Canada-wide Social Impact Challenge in which all MPs are encouraged to spend a day observing and learning about a social good organization in their constituency. Imagine Canada will coordinate the MPs and provide you with background information and suggestions for hosting. If you’re interested and willing to host an MP for a day, please contact Kira Balson.
 
----
Bill C-81, the proposed Accessible Canada Act
 
On June 20th, following the most inclusive and accessible consultation with Canadians with disabilities and with the disability community, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science and Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, introduced the proposed Accessible Canada Act to Parliament. This historic legislation would enable the Government of Canada to take a proactive approach to end systemic discrimination of people with disabilities.
 
The goal of the legislation is to benefit all Canadians, especially Canadians with disabilities, through the progressive realization of a barrier-free Canada. The act would establish a model to eliminate accessibility barriers and lead to more consistent accessibility in areas under federal jurisdiction across Canada.
 
The bill outlines how the Government of Canada will require organizations under federal jurisdiction to identify, remove and prevent barriers to accessibility, including in:
  • the built environment (buildings and public spaces);
  • employment (job opportunities and employment policies and practices);
  • information and communication technologies (digital content and technologies used to access it);
  • the procurement of goods and services;
  • the delivery of programs and services; and
  • transportation (by air as well as by rail, ferry and bus carriers that operate across provincial, territorial or international borders).

The Government of Canada is providing funding of approximately $290 million over six years that will further the objectives of the new legislation.

 
What does this mean for the sport, physical activity & recreation sector? If passed, federally regulated organizations (NSOs, MSOs, etc.) would be required to review and update their current policies to ensure they adhere to the new regulations. Additionally, the bill outlines three duties for all regulated entities.
  • Accessibility plans: Regulated entities would have to create accessibility plans in consultation with people with disabilities. These plans would describe their strategies for improving accessibility and meeting their legal duties. They would have to publicly publish these plans (and let the Government of Canada know when and where they are published) and update them every three years (or sooner, if there are new rules).
  • Feedback tools: Regulated entities would have to set up ways to receive and respond to feedback from their employees and customers. Feedback could include complaints about how the organization is fulfilling its accessibility plan or barriers encountered by individuals.
  • Progress reports: Regulated entities, in consultation with people with disabilities, would have to prepare and publish progress reports that detail how they fulfill their accessibility plans. In the reports, they would also have to explain how they consulted people with disabilities. Progress reports must describe the main concerns of the feedback they received and how they responded to it.
Future regulations would detail how regulated entities must implement these requirements. Details may include when and how accessibility plans and progress reports must be published. Learn more about Bill C-81 here.
 
iMPact Day
 
From August 15 to September 16, 2018, Imagine Canada is launching iMPact Day, a Canada-wide Social Impact Challenge in which all MPs are encouraged to spend a day observing and learning about a social good organization in their constituency.
 
iMPact Day is an opportunity for MPs to get an in-depth primer about what organizations actually do and how they go about doing it. Time spent with board members, staff, and volunteers will give MPs an appreciation of the wide range of roles we play and the work it takes to keep an organization going. MPs will see first-hand how day-to-day operations are impacted by federal regulations and policies - everything from your business activities to how you access grants and contributions.
 
iMPact Day aims to build new bridges between the social good sector and the government in order to learn from each other and to help build the sector’s capacity to succeed. Our goal is to have as many MPs as possible, from every political party, participate in this annual challenge. But the only way we can make this happen is if charities, nonprofits, and social enterprises participate. 
 
Don't miss this opportunity! If you are hosting an event, meetings or willing to have an MP visit your office anytime between August 15 to September 16th this is a great opportunity to promote the good work that your organization does and to keep sport, physical activity and recreation top of mind for MPs.
 
Sport Matters would be happy to support you with this initiative, just let us know. Learn more about iMPact Day here.