F-P/T Priorities for Collaborative Action 2017-2022 - Steps towards Implementation

F-P/T Priorities for Collaborative Action 2017-2022

(Approved by F-P/T SPAR Ministers on July 28, 2017)

Steps towards Implementation

November 24, 2017​

Introduction

  • Following is the list of F-P/T Priorities for Collaborative Action for the period 2017-2022 that was approved by Ministers at their 2017 Conference, as well as information on FPTSC decisions relating to next steps in their implementation.
  • Keeping with the spirit of the Canadian Sport Policy, that a collaborative approach with the sport and related sectors will yield the greatest impact in policy implementation, the recommendations feature the inclusion of sector representation on every recommended new work group.  Sector representation will be determined by the FPTSC as well as in consultation with the Sport Matters Group.
  • In order to manage the costs associated with in-person work group meetings, it is recommended that work group membership be restricted to 8-10 members where possible.  In cases where greater representation in work group proceedings is considered necessary, it is recommended that a second tier of membership be established which would be engaged in frequent consultations.
  • Work group representation should strive for gender balance; representation from other targeted under-represented groups (e.g. persons with a disability) and Indigenous peoples will be considered on a work group-specific basis.
  • It is recommended that each work group would be co-chaired by a Sport Canada and P/T government official, and that newly established work groups would commence with identification of the co-chairs along with a core group of members that would be tasked with preparing a terms of reference, critical path and budget, and additional membership, for review and approval by the FPTSC.
  • The FPTSC agreed, on October 3-4, 2017, to proceed with implementing the new Priorities in the following manner:
    • Four (4) new work groups will be established:
      • Safety, integrity and ethics in sport (#2)
      • Approach for recreational sport (#4)
      • Athlete life-cycle support (#7)
      • Promoting good governance (#9)
    • Three (3) priorities will be addressed by existing work groups, whose mandate and membership would have to be augmented accordingly:
      • Collective evidence management strategy (#1)
      • Alignment with the education sector (#3)
      • Government funding frameworks for sport (#10)
    • Implementation of four (4) priorities will be deferred until the completion of other Priorities, or other initiatives already underway, have been completed:
      • Promoting under-represented populations’ participation in sport (#5)
      • Sport participation educational campaign (#6)
      • Sport for development (#8)
      • F-P/T government policy for sport, physical activity and recreation (#11)       

Issue 1: Collective Evidence Management Strategy

Research on sport issues is increasingly available from both Canadian and international sources, and it is imperative that governments and sport organizations keep apprised of the latest evidence in order to maximize program effectiveness. 

Priority 1:  Develop a strategy for F-P/T governments and the sport sector (and related organizations) to promote collective research agenda-building, data collection, archiving, dissemination and knowledge translation/mobilization activities in support of evidence-based approaches to policy and program development.

The existing SPARC Surveillance and Monitoring WG will adopt this priority because it represents a natural evolution of its work and it already has representation from the sport, physical activity and recreation sectors (to address CSP, Framework for Recreation in Canada, and the Common Vision).

Membership might need to be augmented to have necessary expertise.  Additional sport sector representation might be necessary.

Initiative should begin immediately with a revision of the WG’s terms of reference.

Issue 2: Safety, integrity and ethics in sport

F-P/T governments and the sector must ensure that sufficient attention is given to address ongoing and emerging issues to protect the integrity and ethics of sport and the safety of all participants on and off the field. Acknowledging the multitude of existing resources and the significant efforts already underway in many jurisdictions aimed at addressing those issues, there is a need to strive for harmonization of those activities, especially with respect to educational tools. Several initiatives, both nationally and internationally, occur in isolation and in reaction to a situation. For efficient use of resources and coherence in the implementation, those initiatives need to come together under a common pragmatic and simple approach that each jurisdiction can implement based on their context. The connection with international frameworks would be key to meet both the coherence and the sharing of resources.

Priority 2:   F-P/T governments and the sport sector collaborate in developing and implementing a simple and pragmatic approach that would be applicable to a variety of issues in sport and that would ensure protecting safety, integrity and ethics in sport.

A new FPTSC work group will be established and will approach this priority as a natural progression of other safety issues recently addressed by governments such as combative sports and concussions.

The core group will be comprised of Sport Canada, P/Ts, CCES, CAC and Summer and Winter Caucus chairs.

Initiative should begin immediately with the co-chairs convening a conference call of core members to draft a terms of reference.

 

Issue 3: Alignment with the Education Sector

The provision of physical literacy, physical education and physical activity in the regular school curriculum is the most effective way to ensure inclusive and welcoming access for all Canadian children and youth to these activities.  In addition, engagement with post-secondary institutions on these topics is necessary to impact the next generation of teachers and “curriculum setters”. 

Priority 3: Develop a strategy for F-P/T governments and the sport and related sectors to promote the inclusion of physical literacy, physical education and physical activity in the curriculums, and promote the quality of programming for those activities, in schools at the primary, secondary and post-secondary levels.

The existing SPARC Education Initiative Work Group will adopt this priority.

Initiative should begin immediately with the addition of sport sector representation. 

The initial task will be to manage the Education Initiative that is currently underway.  Additional responsibilities will be determined following completion of Phase 2 Final Report.

                   

Issue 4: Approach for Recreational Sport

The provision of sport programming based on the principles of long-term athlete development is essential for the systematic development of athletes in competitive sport.  Evidence reveals, however, that such programming – or specific components of such programming (such as staged progression) – does not appeal to many of those who wish to participate in sport for purposes of fun, health, social interaction and relaxation.  If efforts to increase participation in sport are to be successful, attention must be devoted to better modelling the user experience in the “recreational sport” context as distinct from the “competitive sport” context which is characterized by pathways and systematic improvement.  The desired approach is intended to be relevant to a wide range of agendas, including: physical activity, social inclusion, community sport, sport for persons with a disability, and sport for development initiatives.

Priority 4: Develop a consumer-driven, participant-based approach to increasing participation in sport across the lifespan that accounts for the motivations and values of existing and potential sport participants in the “recreational sport” participation context.

A new FPTSC work group will be established. 

The evidence and best practices from England and Australia exist.  The task is to apply to the Canadian context in collaboration with sport sector and other stakeholders.

Initial work group representation would include NSOs/P-TSOs, “big cities”, YMCA, CPRA.

The outcomes of this have implications for Priority #5 – Promoting Under-Represented Populations’ Participation in Sport, and Priority #7 – Participation of children and youth in sport, recreation and physical activity.

 

Issue 5: Promoting Under-Represented Populations’ Participation in Sport

Discussions are on-going in the sport sector relating to increasing the participation of under-represented populations in sport.  These discussions build on new evidence, including that presented in the Sue Cragg literature review contracted by the F-P/T Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation Committee, and Sport England’s innovative strategies on this topic.  There is need for a conversation among governments and sector leaders in pursuit of common approaches.  The F-P/T Bilateral Agreements, which have traditionally been focused on efforts to increase participation in sport, could be considered as a means to implement new approaches.

Priority 5: F-P/T governments and sector leaders work to develop common policies and strategies aimed at increasing the participation of under-represented and marginalized populations in sport.

Attention to this priority will commence once Priority 4 has been completed.

Work group composition will decided at that time.

 

Issue 6: Sport Participation Educational campaign 

As recommended in the Final Report of the CSP Formative Evaluation, there is a need to increase the awareness and understanding of parents, volunteers, community and other front-line delivery organizations about the benefits of physical literacy and long-term athlete development principles.  Any initiatives in this regard could be complemented by education related to ethical and safety issues (e.g. concussions) in sport.

Priority 6: Develop a strategy to increase the awareness and understanding of parents, volunteers, community and other front-line organizations, on the topics of physical literacy, long-term athlete development, and safety, values and ethics in sport.

Consideration of this priority will commence in concert with attention to the development of action plans to implement the Common Vision for Increasing Physical Activity and Reducing Sedentary Living in Canada.

 

 

Issue 7: Athlete life-cycle support

At the provincial and national levels, there are a number of athlete support initiatives (helping athletes with, for example: expenses related to: living, equipment, mentorship, mental health, phone and coverage, DTE, financial planning, career transition, employment, and university/college tuition.)  Each of these initiatives has been developed independently.  It is anticipated that attention to alignment and coordination of the multiple initiatives would result in enhanced opportunities, quality of service and support to greater numbers.  The Review of Sport Canada’s Targeted Excellence Approach is expected to inform discussion on this issue.

Priority 7: Conduct a review of athlete support programs offered by governments, NGOs and the private sector, informed by learnings from the Review of Sport Canada’s Targeted Excellence Approach, with the intent of identifying opportunities (including alignment and leverage) to increase the quality of support to greater numbers of athletes aspiring to, and competing at, the high performance level.

A new FPTSC work group will be established.

Initial core group would include Sport Canada and P/T representative as co-chairs, and COC, CPC and AAP.  CSIs, Athletes CAN and OTP would be considered as additional members.

 

 

 

Issue 8: Sport for Development

Recognizing that the Sport for Development (S4D) context of sport participation lacks a shared policy basis and measurement protocol, the CSP Policy Implementation Monitoring Work Group is in the process of contracting a consultant to carry out a literature review of best practices and document all F-P/T government and NGO inter-sectoral domestic and international activity in this area.  It is recommended that this document could serve as a basis for governments and sector leaders to develop common approaches, where appropriate, in this sector of activity.

Priority 8:  F-P/T governments work with sector leaders to develop common principles, definitions and impact measurement tools for Sport for Development activity carried out in Canada, and to consider ways to promote Sport for Development activity throughout Canada.

Next steps be determined once the Final Report for the Sport for Development: Inventory, Literature Review and Recommendations contract (with Sue Cragg Consulting) is available in January 2018.

The final report will provide the basis for subsequent work on this topic.

 

Issue 9: Promoting Good Governance

Recognizing that good governance is the foundation of strong and sustainable sport organizations, there exists a gap in the systemic education relating to governance of Boards and sport leaders.  In recent years a focus initiated by Sport Canada and promoted through SIRC to build good governance awareness within NSOs/MSOs facilitated the transition to the NFP Act. Organizations such as the COC and SIRC engaged experts to develop audit tools and educational resources to help strengthen and guide Boards through their transition.  Similarly provincial initiatives in PQ and MB encouraging increased awareness, access to governance related expertise and coordinated alignment between NSOs and PTSOs have been very well received and are beginning to gain traction.  While the process has well initiated, the issue is broad and goes well beyond simple board operations to areas such as human resource management and dispute resolution processes.  The support of F-P/T governments to continue the momentum and emphasize coordinated educational activities surrounding good governance is a priority.

Priority 9:  F-P/T governments and sector leaders work to develop common strategies on how best to promote good governance in sport organizations in a manner that maximizes efficiencies and aligns NSO and P/TSO practices.

A new FPTSC work group will be established.  Core group will include Sport Canada and P/T governments and COC, and consideration of Sport, Law and Strategy Group, Club Excellence (via CCES?), and Imagine Canada.

 

 

Issue 10: Government Funding Frameworks for Sport

Currently at both the provincial/territorial and national level, there are a number of approaches to assessing, regulating and incentivizing National and P/T Sport Organizations as well as measuring their return on investment.  In developing frameworks for recognition and investment, emphasis is being placed on indicators that are: clear, that reflect key policy objectives, and that can provide data for the creation of profile and measures against their investment and impact.  Attention needs to be given to developing a more aligned and integral system to support these efforts; or at the very least, share current and best practices (both inside and external to sport).

Priority 10: F-P/T governments and sector representatives conduct a review of government funding frameworks for sport in order to identify opportunities for alignment and coordination between government and sector interests in the funding of sport.

The existing FPTSC Funding Framework Alignment Work Group will adopt this priority.  

Sport sector representation will need to be added to the work group.

Issue 11: F-P/T Government Policy for Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation

As reported in the Final Report on the CSP Formative Evaluation, the existence of three separate F-P/T government policies for sport, physical activity and recreation creates confusion for community organizations that are responsible for leadership and programming in each of the three sectors.  The Final Report includes a recommendation that governments undertake a process to clarify how the three policies relate to each other for the benefit of organizations at all levels in the three sectors. 

Priority 11:  F-P/T governments and sport, physical activity and recreation sector representatives develop recommendations for promoting the common elements of the Canadian Sport Policy, Let’s Get Moving: A Common Vision for Physical Activity in Canada and the Framework for Recreation in Canada for the benefit of community-based organizations and their leadership activities.

This work will be initiated, in a manner to be determined, once the Common Vision for Increasing Physical Activity and Reducing Sedentary Living in Canada has been endorsed by governments.

 

Sport Sector Nominations for FPTSC Work Group Membership

January 12, 2018

Work Group

Nominees

Status

Issue 1:  Collective Evidence

Debra Gassewitz, SIRC

Nominee accepted.

Issue 2: Safety, integrity and ethics in sport

Paul Melia, CCES 

Ashley Labrie (AthletesCAN),

Marie Claude Asselin (SDRCC)

Marg McGregor (COC)

Kiera Torkko (CAC)

All nominees accepted.

Issue 3: Alignment with the Education Sector

 

 

Paul Carson, VP of Membership Development, Hockey Canada

Debra Armstrong, Skate Canada

Rob Guy, Athletics Canada       

Jordan Burwash (or Stephanie Talsma new CEO), PHE

David Goldstein, U-Sport

Sandra Murray-McDonnell, CCAA

Still to be determined.

Issue 4: Approach for Recreational Sport

 

Shane Pearsall, Cross Country Canada

Joe Morrisette, Badminton Canada

All nominees accepted.

Issue 6:  Sport Participation Education

 

Carolyn Trono, S4L

Elio Atunes, Participaction

A work group is not expected to be established until after the Let’s Get Moving Common Vision has been approved by governments.

Issue 7: Athlete Life Cycle

Catherine Gosselin, CPC

Ashley Labrie, AthletesCAN,

Blair McIntosh, Special Olympics

Nominee accepted.

Nominee accepted.

Blair to be contacted by WG co-chair for discussion.

Issue 8:  Sport 4 development

Lisa Kwiatkowski, Motivate

Allison Sandmayer-Graves, CAAWS

A work group has not yet been established.

Issue 9: Promoting Good Governance

Bruce Robinson, Freestyle

Marg McGregor, COC

Lorraine Lafreniere, CAC

Debra Gassewitz, SIRC

All nominees accepted.

 

Issue 10: Government Funding Frameworks for Sport

 

Katherine Henderson, Curling

Bruce Robinson, Freestyle

Jeff Sauve, Field Hockey

Tamara Medwidsky, Wrestling Canada

Paul Melia, CCES

Marg McGregor, COC

Lane MacAdam, OTP

Nominees accepted as follows:

1 co-chair from each of Winter and Summer NSO Caucuses; COC; OTP; CPC.

Issue 11: F-P/T Government Policy for Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation

Patrick Jarvis, Snowboard

Lindsay Hugenholtz, Sport Matters Group

Marco DiBuono: Canadian Tire Jumpstart

Heather Kaulbach, Aboriginal Sport Circle

A work group has not yet been established.

Canadian Sport Policy Collaborative Management Work Group

Lindsay Hugenholtz, Sport Matters Group

Karen O’Neill, Canadian Paralympic Committee

Bruce Robinson, Freestyle 

Debra Gassewitz, SIRC

All nominees accepted.